Add to your cellphone and send pics straight to Holla Back NYC

HollabackNYC is now also accepting video submissions: Catch that jerk with your video phone or do journalistic style feature on Street Harassment and we'll post it!

Email your submissions here!

We welcome submissions from everywhere.

Join the HollaBackNYC Mailing List

Keep informed of upcoming events, screenings, and the Post of the Month!


If you have questions about street harassment or about our site, consult our list of Frequently Asked Questions for more information.

For info on HollaBack's commitment to antiracism, click here.


Hollaback on the go by tweeting your street harassment stories! Add #hbnyc to all posts and follow us @iHollaback:



Want HollaBack to come and speak at your school, dorm, or organization? Email Emily at


  • Want a street harassment expert to tell you what it's really like on the streets? Email Emily May at

Articles by HollabackNYC co-founders


Holla Without Borders:
International press coverage!


Check out HollaBack merchandise!

Design courtesy of Colleen Keegan

Check out photos from our past events here!

Click to see the raunchiest, nastiest street assholes around!

Powered by Blogger

Support Bloggers' Rights!
Support Bloggers' Rights!

Get Firefox!

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial ShareAlike 2.5 License.

Wednesday, June 30, 2010

Summoning my Inner Warriors I, II and III

Walking home from yoga class, on 7th avenue and Prospect Avenue, I looked up to hear a man whispering softly under his breath, in my ear:

"I want to fuck the shit out of you."

Where is all the shanti in the world when you need it?

Submitted by Emily


As we are always saying over here at Hollaback!, SEXUAL VIOLENCE ISN’T CULTURAL. We hear this one ALL the time, which of course forces us to collectively roll our eyes and sigh dramatically.

The anecdotal evidence that we collect on this blog shows that in NYC all kinds of men harass women and all kinds of women experience harassment. This fantastic New York Times op-ed discusses sexual violence in Congo and argues that dismissing it as cultural is demeaning and counter-productive.

While we are still working to collect accurate statistics about street harassment here in the States, this study conducted in the Netherlands states that 59% of sexual harassment incidents last year occurred in public spaces. No surprises there…

Ms. Magazine
follows up with further coverage of “eve-teasers” in India and Bangladesh.

Blogger Kimberly McLeod discusses catcalling, suggests a few responses, and even gives a shout-out to Hollaback!

Finally, this is the LAST DAY TO VOTE for Hollaback! in the Revelation to Action Competition. Let’s make this happen everyone!!!

And of course we are counting down the days until our LAUNCH PARTY on July 8! See you there!

Thanks to Feministing and Bust for spreading the word!

Monday, June 28, 2010

10 days to launch!

With only ten days left on our trusty pepto-bismol pink website, we've got two very exciting announcements.

First, 16 edits, 8 months, 356 donors later, we just submitted our iPhone application to Apple yesterday! Fingers crossed.

Second, the wonderful ladies at cozy wallet will be sponsoring our launch party! Cozy Wallet ( is a gateway free stuff, discounts and giveways. Check out their website at See the event details here.

Wednesday, June 23, 2010

This Week in Street Harassment...

Our launch party is coming - which means the new site and iPhone app are too! Will you be there to see it all begin?

Only a little over ONE WEEK TO GO to get your VOTE in for our Changemaker's "Action to Revelation" competition! This isn't like the 2000 election: your vote matters here. The three groups that get the most votes win $5,000 and will be honored in front of over 200 people!

In my favorite response to ‘eve-teasing’ so far, Indian women learn how to use a dupatta, a traditional scarf that denotes modesty, for self-defense!

Mobile technology and web 2.0 media are powerful tools for social change, and they are becoming increasingly accessible. Egyptian women use ‘citizen media’ to highlight the problem of street harassment and my favorite blogger at the Economist discusses the increasing ubiquity of cell phones, even in impoverished areas.

A disproportionate number of homeless youth identify as LGBTQ. LGBTQ folks already often experience harassment and violence in public spaces, and of course the risks are much greater when you are unable to retreat from those spaces.

In this shout-out to Hollaback! NYC and Hollaback! DC, Emily Hauser reminds us that street harassment is part of a continuum of violence against women and that so-called “compliments” can still be used to express dominance.

PRESS RELEASE: Hollaback! is a Finalist in the Revelation to Action Competition!

Hollaback! has been announced as a finalist in the online competition, Revelation to Action: Your Place. Your Idea. Your Change., sponsored by Green Mountain Coffee® and Ashoka’s Changemakers. The Revelation to Action competition seeks to find and help fund creative solutions for motivating local citizens to strengthen communities across New England and New York. To win, Hollaback! needs your vote:

Hollaback! is an international movement to end street harassment using mobile technology. According to Hollaback! executive director Emily May, “Street harassment is a gateway crime. It is one of the most pervasive forms of violence against women, and one of the least legislated against. On behalf of women across the world, we are honored to be a finialist."

Hollaback! is one of 15 finalists out of 358 entrants across the Northeast for its innovation, social impact, and sustainability. Through the use of mobile technology, Hollaback! will provide women and girl with a real-time, empowered response to harassment. Each Hollaback! will be mapped, showing exactly when and where harassment happens. Hollaback! currently has eight sites across the globe: New York, DC, Chicago, Savannah, Charleston, London, Hong Kong, and Toronto.

You can vote for Hollaback! and learn more about their work by visiting The deadline to vote is June 30th.

To vote:

1. Please sign in or register: go to, create a profile and complete the registration. Your email will need to be verified to help prevent voter fraud.

2. Go to the Revelation to Action competition: (

3. Scroll down and you will see a list of entries with vote buttons – you can read short descriptions about the projects by clicking "Preview" next to the titles

4. Choose Hollaback! as one of your three favorite entries – if you haven't signed in, clicking on vote will prompt you to create a new profile or sign in.

All finalists will receive an invitation to showcase their innovations at the Revelation to Action Celebration Event in Boston. The three finalists with the most votes will be selected as Competition Winners and announced at the event. Additionally, Green Mountain Coffee will select seven State Winners from each participating state. State winners will also be announced at the Celebration Event. The ten winners will also receive $5,000 to help fund their innovations.

"Hollaback! provides a platform where every women and girl is a changemaker in the movement to end street harassment. We're ending street harassment, one Hollaback! at a time." said Emily May, executive director of Hollaback!

Sunday, June 20, 2010

"Cat Calls" are anything but Poetic, until now.

Nails the idea of brilliance interrupted and flirts with "what women really want" in this funny sarcastic piece. Brought to us by Amalia Ortiz from Def Poetry.

Friday, June 18, 2010

Guest post: Judy Brown's Take on What Works in fending off the Harassers

At Hollaback!, we are going to start doing guest posts. You will see a lot more of these when we re-launch our site in July. Please note, these posts do not necessarily reflect our views. They are intended to start a conversation and reflect a diversity of tactics. If you would like to submit your HOLLAperspective, send it to holla (at)

I don’t believe that guys on the street hollering at women believe they’re going to get a date: it’s definitely about entitlement, if not harassment.

And yes, it just keeps coming: I’m 60 and fat, both of which are great for lessening street harassment, but even age and padding haven't ended it completely, I'm sorry to tell you.

However, while living in New York City for a decade as an under five-foot tall girl I evolved a system that’s kept me safe for 40 years, while getting rid of the PUAs (self-styled Pick Up Artists), harassers, stalkers or whichever strange man was bothering me in a public place. (With the added pleasure of embarrassing some, and scaring off others.)

Ignoring strange men intent on a pickup on the street often didn’t work: they had the “excuse” that I may not have heard them, and while repeating their harassment some of ’em worked themselves up into a lather that that I was being “rude” because I’d ignored them.

Sorry: Yelling at the clods to leave me alone only resulted in a psycho screaming at the top of his lungs that he could do whatever he wanted to me, while following, for blocks.

After a couple years, I discovered that the key to successfully dealing with street harassment from men was to acknowledge it in a dull monotone, and pretend it was—get this—a matter of "manners.”

I come from the generation whose parents insisted children learn basic manners, including "Please", "Thank you," and "You're welcome," so I respond with that politesse automatically, to this day.

Even when the situation may not warrant it. But when my disinterested, but seemingly polite, "No, thank you," to a street harasser's request (for a date, coffee, whatever) actually stopped him, dumbfounded in his tracks, I realized I may have stumbled onto something workable.

From there on in, to every approach I’d repeat in a neutral or monotone, “I’m terribly sorry, but I never speak to strangers on the street,” (or variation “I‘m sorry, but I never speak to strangers.”) rinse and repeat, while moving on. (Don’t smile, that can be seen as an encouragement.)

An neutral tone and overtly “polite” response didn’t give the psychos or PUAs an excuse to abuse me for my disinterest, or to continue to harass me, usually.

A request of any sort from the street harasser was also responded to, again, in an emotionless, “No, thank you.” Rinse and repeat, while moving away at a deliberate pace.

(With a bonus: if the request has been obscene, and guy has friends around him, they then laughed at him after my “polite” response.)

However, if the clod persisted after “polite” neutral-toned dismissals, I discovered how to deflect that attack, too—largely because when someone was rude enough to frighten me, my next natural response was anger that he’d had the nerve.

The one time I was groped, on an up escalator at Port Authority bus terminal, the guy behind me grabbed my thigh.

My natural, indignant response, ”Are you insane?” had him backing down the escalator, apologizing.

Righteous indignation after a line crossed, usually resulted in a PUA or strange man backing away and apologizing, believe it or not— as long as I made it a matter of manners.

“Do you realize how rude it is to follow me and frighten me!” Late at night, followed through empty blocks by drunks, and yet invariably apologized to.

However, if there were other people on the street and I was being followed, I’d point it out calmly, “That man is following me,” and cross the street. That would end THAT.

After I moved to Los Angeles and a guy in a sports car followed me for blocks through Beverly Hills after I’d politely told him, no I didn’t want a ride, I turned and said, “I said, no thank you.”

Another block of following, and I turned and spat, “Listen buddy, don’t fuck with me — I’m from New York.”

At which point, PUA and sports car peeled out.

(WARNING: If, after your neutral or monotone “polite” response the harasser immediately cycles into anger or abuse, don’t escalate the situation: repeat over and over in the same neutral tone, “I’m not interested. Please go way. Please go away,” as you move away. No rise out of you, and he doesn‘t have the excuse he wants to escalate the abuse. At least, that‘s how I got rid of a multiple offender.)

So that’s the system: “polite” response in emotionless monotone, rinse and repeat, while moving on, usually deflects the harassers. Until or unless he crosses the line, and then righteous indignation usually backs them off.

However, if your harasser is abusively angry from the gitgo, neutral tone or monotone requests for him to leave you alone, repeated endlessly, is better for getting rid of him and keeping you safe.

I'd also recommend you keep the number of the local police station on speed dial -- 911 isn't as fast from a cell. I now work in a public place where I don't have the option of leaving when harassed, but when several monotone requests for them to leave hasn't worked, threatening to call the police, flipping open my phone and/or actually calling the cops, or a more local authority, has sent my harassers running, or at least ambling, away. However, I've also never shown fear while doing so, I spoke in the same calm, emotionless tone of voice -- I think guys who harass women on the street get some sort of satisfication from frightening or upsetting those women.

The above system has kept me safe for four decades as a woman living in several big cities, as well as giving me a way to respond to harassers that gave them no satisfaction.

Thursday, June 17, 2010

Terrible Pizza, Wolf Whistles, and No Manners to Boot!

This is my first time writing Hollaback! I’m writing to you as a passive, introverted, fed-up, woman. I’m 24 years old, and I’ve lived in NYC since I was 20. Okay, I get it. Men are going to cat-call me, and it makes me feel….well, you know exactly how it feels. A couple of months ago one of those sketchy $1 pizza places opened up on 38th & 8th and EVERY SINGLE DAY one of the guys who works there whistles SO loud at me- then all of the other workers stare. I’ve seen him do it to other women too, and it is even more annoying because it’s SO busy on that corner and the loud whistle gets the attention of everyone on the block. I’ve googled the business, but I’ve found no corporate or franchise info. However, I absolutely needed to write an angry email to someone… lucky you! Is there anything I can do to regain my dignity at 8:30am every weekday morning? Or do I have to walk out of my way down another block to feel like a decent individual again?

Submitted by Jennifer

Wednesday, June 16, 2010

This Week in Street Harassment...

The New York Times covers “Hey Baby,” the street harassment video game. I was shocked the author hadn’t experienced street harassment personally, until I noticed the name “Seth” in the by-line…woops!

Also, listen to our own Emily May discuss the video game with the creator on NPR:

***Favorite Emily quote of the interview: “No, I did not like shooting guys at all. I will be totally frank. It totally freaked me out… I would much rather have had a bar of soap to go around washing their mouths out with than I would a gun.”

For anyone in your life who needs an educational introduction to the problem of street harassment, Melody Thomas “calls out the catcallers” and even gives a shout out to Hollaback!

Miss D.C. has been speaking out about street harassment, and defends her position in a new interview:

Here is an update on global street harassment and the response to “eve teasing” in Bangladesh:

More coverage of “Eve Teasing Protection Day” is available here:

And finally, let’s not forget that HOLLABACK LONDON has LAUNCHED!!!!! I heart solidarity. Also, how awesome is the nail art at Wah Nails, supporters of the movement to end street harassment ?!?! I’m not usually a big manicure girl, but these guys might have turned me into a believer.

Tuesday, June 15, 2010

Everyday is a HOLLAday
Hollaback! iPhone App & Site Launch Party

Come and celebrate the beginning of the end of street harassment! After five years of running Hollaback as a blog, we're growing up, relaunching our site, and launching an iPhone app that will track exactly when and where street harassment happens. We're building a world where everyone has the right to feel safe, confident, and sexy - one hollaback at time.

Dolly Trolly and DJs Miss Bliss and Emily Allen will be spinning killer tunes throughout the night. More entertainment will be announced in the coming weeks.

Tickets are $12 at the door
And $8 for our fabulous KickStarter contributors!
All proceeds benefit Hollaback!

Get in for FREE by becoming a HOLLAhero!
To become a HOLLAhero you can either:
-Bring 10 friends
-Bring 5 friends and 1 silent auction item
-Bring 2 silent auction items

Please note, HOLLAheroes must sign up in advance of the event.

Email Rebecca at if you are interested in becoming a HOLLAhero or for event details.

UPDATE: We're thrilled to announce that we have an Android app and SMS texting in the works as well!

The most amazing song about street harassment ever written

To read the lyrics or meet the genius, click here.

Saturday, June 12, 2010

Concretely Beautiful

"You're beautiful" he said, running towards me from his concrete truck on my block. Once he stopped running and I stopped worrying that it was going to escalate, I thought to myself: "hell yes I am!" but I'm also smart, loving, and passionate. Why don't people yell those things at me?

Oh right, I forgot.

All the world is a stage. Unless you're a woman, in which case it's a pageant.

Friday, June 11, 2010

No, really, I woke up this morning hoping I'd be attacked by a mob of genital-grabbing hockey fans.

Well, Hollaback, here is my story.

I was inside my car, so not sure if this qualifies as street harassment, but it was incredibly scary and some of it was sexual, so I thought I would share. I don't have pictures because I was driving and wanted to get where it was safe. At that point I whipped out my phone and called 911. Supposedly they sent someone there to deal with the mob.

I was driving home from a late night roller derby practice and went through a student-heavy area of town to get home. This isn't my normal route, but of course after roller skating for two hours I needed ice cream. So I ended up on Green Street. I forgot about the Stanley Cup since I'm not a hockey fan, but started noticing throngs of people in hockey jerseys and realized what was going on.

Then I got to a mob of at least fifty people, almost entirely men, cheering on one man as he hoisted a young woman over his shoulder and ran her across the street. I couldn't tell if it was consensual and they were joking around; it seemed consensual but I know that women are good at looking like they are going along with something when afraid for their lives as a defense mechanism. A burly man in a Harley was waiting at the stop light ahead of me and we watched the mob.

When the light turned green, the mob rushed out at us. They tried to make a tunnel for the motorcyclist, who just slowly and carefully picked his way past them. They didn't give him a lot of trouble, and he looked like he could have kicked their scrawny college asses. But then my tiny 2001 Honda Civic came along, with a woman driving and a baby seat in the back.

Instead of parting out of the way, the mob swarmed me. At least twenty of them surrounded my car, cheering and screaming at me, putting their faces in the windows, hitting my car, spitting on it and throwing beer at it. One man was videotaping the whole thing from his phone, slowly walking in front of me and leering. Another man jumped in front of my car and kept pretending to be hit by it, and then to additional cheers started fondling his package and dancing in front of my car. I was petrified I was going to accidentally hit one of them and hurt them, even as another part of me was so angry that I wanted to hurt them. I tried not to make eye contact with anyone, had one hand partially obscuring my face, and drove very, very slowly looking straight ahead, until I was clear of them.

Once I was a safe distance away, I called the police. Then I drove home, shaking all the way. I have no idea what I could have done differently and suspect any other behavior would have only made them crazier. I am so glad I happened to have all my doors locked and windows up. Who knows what would have happened if one of them had been able to get in my car (I couldn't tell from the thumping whether they were trying the doors or not). Not only was that one of the scariest experiences of my life, I am disgusted that the Champaign Police weren't already dealing with the mob, since by all appearances they had been harassing individuals and drivers for some time. Further, all of the men looked very young and I wouldn't be surprised if a number of them were below drinking age.

Thank you for creating a space to share stories of street harassment. I guess it turns out that even professors can be harassed by their own students.

Submitted by Kathryn

Got five minutes? We've got three opportunities.

So, you want to end street harassment. And you want to do it now. Taking action and volunteering is about more than stuffing envelopes and making calls. Here are three quick ways you can volunteer for Hollaback from the comfort of your computer:

1. We are a finalist in the "Revelation to Action" competition. Vote for us and if we win, Hollaback! wins $5,000. This will help us cover marketing costs to get the word out about Hollaback! You'll need to quickly login before you vote.

2. Be a HOLLAhero and invite friends to attend our launch party. It's on July 8th at Southpaw in Brooklyn. You'll get to see our new app, new site, and meet some incredible HOLLArockstars. You'll help spread the word about the Hollaback movement.

3. Write a glowing review of Hollaback! that will be seen by potential foundations. In case you didn't know, foundations have BIG BUCKS! The more you write, the less we'll need to ask you for money in the future, and the happier we will all be.

Thursday, June 10, 2010

Another Frog

Kissy noises. Gross.

The silver car in front of the bus was a symphony of kissy. When will these frogs learn that you'll never be a ladies prince if you keep making random kissy noises at them on the street?

Introduce yourself. Learn my name. Ask me on a date. I'll tell you I have a boyfriend, but will admire your chivalry and refer you to my friend. Go on a date with her. Ask her what she thinks about life, politics, love. Play your cards right and then maybe you'll be able to make some real awesome kissy noises.

Submitted by Emily May

Wednesday, June 09, 2010

We are a finalist in the Changemaker's "Revelation to Action" Competition!

WE MADE IT - 358 people entered and only 15 were chosen! Now, we need your help to win the prize: VOTE NOW and the world wins.

Only three weeks to vote! The three finalists with the most votes win. Change the world and vote today.

Hollaback responds to the "Hey Baby" Game

Here's us on WPIX:

And here's us on NPR's "Tell Me More":

Monday, June 07, 2010

Why I Hollaback: Justine's Story

This is the thirteenth video in the "Why I Hollaback" series. "Why I Hollaback" tells the story of how and why folks decide to take the leap, speak up, and start Holla'ing back. We will release a new story every Monday and accept submissions from all over the world. So tell us your story -- Why do you Hollaback?

Saturday, June 05, 2010

Hollaback from Berlin, Germany!

I can't remember the twists of fate that led me to your website within the past month. I read about your work and the testimonies of many brave women in NYC and around the world.

Your message apparently sank in and yesterday evening on my way home from gamelan practice, I sat down in an S-Bahn station next to three young men who proceeded to wolf-whistle twice at women who walked by. I confronted them about their behavior -- told them that women don't appreciate such attention, that it is not a compliment (as they tried to insist), rather a burden. When they tried in their mediocre way to debate the issue, another woman stepped in and told them if they didn't agree they were free to leave the station -- she'd be happy to call the police to escort them out if they preferred.

We have allies everywhere!

Thanks for helping me to find my voice, and helping me speak out for others who aren't in a position to do so.

Submitted by Hilary

Friday, June 04, 2010

Our newest site: LONDON!

HollabackLDN lauched today, giving London a badass response to street harassment. The project is led by Julia Gray and Sharmadean Reid, a fearless and fashion-forward duo. Sharmadean is also the founder of WAH-Nails, a self proclaimed "badass nail shop" in London that is also located in the famous TopShop. That's a lot of badass, but what can I say -- Julia and Sharmadean are pretty badass ladies.

If you crack open a history book you will see that much of the domestic violence movement happened in salons. Think about it: you are surrounded by friendly, chatty women, you go to the salon more than you go to the doctor, and it takes getting pretty up close and personal to get that perfect 'do. Street harassment is on a spectrum of violence against women. It carries many of the same traits, and many of the same solutions. So when we heard that the street harassment movement was happening in a nail shop we thought: BEAUTIFUL.

HollabackLDN is giving the "wankers" a run for their money and showing Londoners that they have the right to feel safe, confident, and sexy (for inspiration on the sexy, check out WAH-nails beautiful nail art). When the team first hatched the idea to launch HollabackLDN, Sharmadean said in a conversation with me, "2009 I launched the nail shop, 2010 is all about the girls. I want empower girls, and get them to stop being scared of themselves." That's exactly what they are doing, one hollaback at a time.

Check out HollabackLDN and if you live in London, contact them to see how you can get involved!

Make the streets and subways safer, professionally.

RightRides for Women's Safety is currently hiring for a Deputy Director position. They are seeking candidates with 2+ years experience in development and policy, with experience in social justice, community organizing and related movements. The right candidate is passionate for ending gender-based violence and also has a record of successful grant writing, coordinating coalitions, and mobilizing communities towards change. They are a small office now, but the Deputy Director will help us grow the organization and this position has ample room for growth. For more info and application instructions, click here. As an added bonus, the new Deputy Director will work with Hollaback! through our work with New Yorkers for Safe Transit!

One Step Too Far

The campaign in Wales that brought us the amazing PSA that we posted yesterday has also put together a website and a video (above). Their message to men: "To you its nothing, but it all adds up." Well said.

Country by country, campaign by campaign, the world is working together to end street harassment. You're a part of it, we're a part of it, and together we're creating a world we can only imagine.

Thursday, June 03, 2010

Forgive me if I forgot to say "thank you," as I was busy fearing for my life.

I just saw this take place -- sadly it happened too quickly for me to snap a pic.

I was walking on 11th between 1st and A, when I saw in front of me what appeared to be the start of a street brawl. These two massive dudes were screaming fighting words down the street at someone or something I couldn't make out, whom I assumed to be another group of equally fired-up guys. "WHO THE F**K DO YOU THINK YOU ARE" and "HOLD ME BACK" and "F**K YOU" came from this one guy as his equally giant/terrifying friend sort of half-assedly tried to "hold him back." I walked around them, trying to keep my distance but also keep an eye on the seemingly epic street fight that was about to take place. It was at exactly that moment that this guy, now red-faced and sweaty, shouted "IT WAS A F**KING COMPLIMENT!"

Something clicked. I finally see who he's yelling at. It's a young woman who cannot be more than 5'2", who now has her head down and is clearly terrified. She was gone around the corner before I could fully fathom what I was seeing -- a grown man screaming at a woman, who had clearly just responded negatively to his street-advances, as though he were in a bar fight in Jersey City. The very slim silver lining was that he was being theatrical (read: horrifying) enough that it attracted a lot of attention on the street. Men and women alike seemed really shocked by what was happening, so maybe, maybe someone who didn't realize the abusive nature of street harassment which lies just under the thin veil of charm/banter learned something today. Who knows.

To that young woman, red-haired, I believe with dreadlocks, I'm sorry that happened to you, and that dude deserves to be castrated.

Submitted by Arianna

My mirror tells me the same thing in a much less creepy way.

Had to email this in because it was such a ridiculous sequence of events.

Just after speaking on a panel at a HEALTHY TEEN RELATIONSHIPS conference, I walk out the door to a man who says you’re beautiful in a creepy way. I was not on my game so I stood there in disgust and he says well say thank you and walks away. Then as I’m walking to the subway another creepster (this one an old man in work clothes) whispers youre beautiful as he walks by. I clearly need to learn how to summon my reactions better but I just couldn’t believe that I left a conference that educates young people about healthy relationships—and their key feature, respect—and got harassed by two men in a row. If men knew about respect for women, we wouldn’t need conferences to teach teens how to avoid abusive partners. Sigh.

Submitted by Karin

NO is a full sentence.

Ugh... lately I've been getting harassed so much that it's become really tiring. Every day for the past week or two I've had some pervert say something gross to me or do something creepy. I'm very independent and like to be on my own a lot, but since I'm a young (20) female, I feel like that makes me a prime target for harassment. To sum up the creepiest people:

About two weeks ago I was waiting for a train in a very corporate part of the city. I was standing near another girl, and then a very professional looking man came and stood between the two of us. I wrongly assumed he wouldn't be creepy because of the way he was dressed. He started pacing back and forth between the two of us, and I also noticed him staring at me. When we got on the train he took a seat, and the girl and I stood across from each other in opposite doorways. He was VERY obviously looking at her and when she darted her head in his direction he quickly looked away. Then she went to a different part of the train, probably because he was freaking her out. Then he turned his attention to me. Okay, whatever, he's looking at me. Creepy, but I can deal with it. BUT THEN he whipped out his phone and REALLY OBVIOUSLY took a picture of me. I got off at the next stop. Now this creepy asshole has a picture of me and probably jerked off to it. Ugh.

A few days ago I was at Columbus Circle sitting at the fountain. For awhile I noticed that this guy was sitting next to me, not doing anything in particular. But a lot of people were sitting at the fountain so I didn't think much of it. I was on the phone with someone for a long time, and right when I hung up he tried to start a conversation with me but I could tell he was trying something so I got up and left. As I'm walking away, listening to my music, I notice the same guy walking behind me. He was walking behind me for a few minutes and I could tell he was looking at me... I couldn't believe he was actually following me. He started asking me questions like my name and what I'm doing in the city. I know I shouldn't have responded to him and should have just told him to fuck off, but I made up some bullshit and then when I quickly took an unexpected turn he finally left me alone.

Finally, today I was once again at Columbus Circle at the fountain (yeah, maybe I should just stop going there) taking pictures. This guy was trying to talk to me, saying things like "hey, hey girl. Hey, hey, hey!" But I just kept ignoring him and calmly walked away like I couldn't hear him. As I was walking away though I saw the same guy following me. I thought maybe he just happened to be walking the same direction as me, but that definitely wasn't the case. At first I wanted to just try to ignore him but I knew it wouldn't work. He told me something like "Hey, I want to talk to you. You look really good." I told him twice that I didn't want to talk to him, but then he started describing the parts of me that looked good to him... gross. Then he asked me if I was single, and even when I said no he asked if I wanted to do something sexual with him (although he didn't put it so conservatively). I didn't show my rage because I didn't want him to know he was affecting me. So I just calmly told him "nope" and he turned around and walked the opposite direction.

Submitted by A.

Anti-violence campaign targets abusive attitudes

BBC - June 2, 2010 A campaign across Wales to combat violence against women is challenging men to abandon any demeaning attitudes they hold.

A TV advert shows "abusive" behaviour towards a woman, including being leered at and enduring sexist comments.

Social Justice Minister Carl Sargeant said while that could seem harmless to men, women can feel threatened.

Welsh Women's Aid said tackling "widespread social attitudes" was crucial.

The advert shows a gang of men in a van sounding their horn and gesturing at the woman in the street, a male office colleague ogling her, and two strangers in a bar making suggestive remarks as she passes.

The video ends with her being followed down a dark street by another man, with the headline One Step Too Far.

It then asks: "To you it's nothing, but it all adds up. Where does 'harmless' end and 'abusive' begin?"

The Welsh Assembly Government said the campaign aimed to "stamp out unacceptable attitudes and behaviour towards women before it leads to more violent forms of abuse".

It said it did this by highlighting "how seemingly innocent actions may be a step too far and lead to women feeling unsafe".

Click here to read the full BBC article and watch the video campaign.

What do you do when you see a woman getting messed with on the train? Pants 'em!